Kak Ubit Drakona

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Illustration of a winged, fire-breathing dragon by Friedrich Justin Bertuch from 1806

Carved imperial Chinese dragons at Nine-Dragon WallBeihai ParkBeijing

Dragons in the bow of a Russian Viking ship. Ystad 2019.

dragon is a large, serpentine legendary creature that appears in the folklore of many cultures around the world. Beliefs about dragons vary drastically by region, but dragons in western cultures since the High Middle Ages have often been depicted as winged, horned, four-legged, and capable of breathing fireDragons in eastern cultures are usually depicted as wingless, four-legged, serpentine creatures with above-average intelligence.

The earliest attested reports of draconic creatures resemble giant snakes. Draconic creatures are first described in the mythologies of the ancient Near East and appear in ancient Mesopotamian art and literature. Stories about storm-gods slaying giant serpents occur throughout nearly all Indo-European and Near Eastern mythologies. Famous prototypical draconic creatures include the mušḫuššu of ancient MesopotamiaApep in Egyptian mythologyVṛtra in the Rigveda; the Leviathan in the Hebrew BiblePythonLadonWyvern, and the Lernaean Hydra in Greek mythologyJörmungandrNíðhöggr, and Fafnir in Norse mythology; and the dragon from Beowulf.